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Sunday, July 19, 2020 | History

2 edition of importance of glutamine metabolism to macrophage function found in the catalog.

importance of glutamine metabolism to macrophage function

Colin J. Murphy

importance of glutamine metabolism to macrophage function

by Colin J. Murphy

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  • 3 Currently reading

Published by University College Dublin in Dublin .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Macrophages.,
  • Phagocytes.,
  • Glutamine -- Metabolism.,
  • Immune system.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementColin J. Murphy.
    ContributionsUniversity College Dublin. Department of Biochemistry.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination(10), viii, 353p. :
    Number of Pages353
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17528835M

    P. Newsholme, R. Curi, T.C. Pithon Curi, C.J. Murphy, C. Garcia, M. Pires de Melo, Glutamine metabolism by lymphocytes, macrophages, and neutrophils: its importance in health and disease11This review is written to mark the retirement of Prof. Eric A. Newsholme, University of Oxford, United Kingdom, and to acknowledge his contribution to the.   The cellular nutrient glutamine launches a metabolic signaling pathway that promotes the function of some immune system T cells and suppresses others, researchers have discovered.

    Consequently, alteration in amino acid metabolism, such as glutamine, has been previously shown to occur in cancer cells Glutamine is the most abundant amino acid in humans, but even though glutamine is generally described as nonessential, it is necessary for the growth of many cultured cancer cell lines. Glutamine is an important source of. Therefore, one may consider that KCs and other resident macrophages acquired the ability to synthesize glutamine, enabling undisturbed macrophage function under conditions of low blood levels of glutamine. However, further studies are needed to establish the role and the pathophysiological implications of GS for the function of sessile macrophages.

      In addition, amino acid metabolism, especially arginine, glutamine, serine, glycine, and tryptophan, is critical for T cell differentiation and macrophage polarization. Second, mitochondria can activate the inflammatory response. For instance, mitochondrial antiviral signaling and NLRP3 can be activated by mitochondria.   Glutamine metabolism as a whole is a crucial element of cancer cell metabolism. Glutamine is important for nucleotide synthesis, amino acid production, redox balance, glycosylation, extracellular matrix production, a recent study demonstrated that glutamine depletion enhances M1 and reduces M2 macrophage phenotype and function.


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Importance of glutamine metabolism to macrophage function by Colin J. Murphy Download PDF EPUB FB2

Glutamine (the most abundant amino acid in the plasma of humans and many other mammals including rats) is effective in inducing polarization of M2 macrophages through the. Macrophages consume relatively large amounts of glu- tamine [34–36]. The importance of glutamine metabolism to macrophage function has been reported previously.

However, a systematic study of glutamine utilization by resident or BCG-activated murine macro- phages or human monocytes in different culture con- ditions has not been reported.

Glutamine is the most abundant and versatile amino acid in the body, and is of fundamental importance to intermediary metabolism, interorgan nitrogen exchange via ammonia (NH 3) transport between tissues, and pH by: Glutamine Metabolism in Macrophages: A Novel Target for Obesity/Type 2 Diabetes - PubMed Obesity is a nutritional disorder resulting from a chronic imbalance between energy intake and expenditure.

This disease is characterized by inflammation in multiple cell types, including by: During catabolic/hypercatabolic situations glutamine can become essential for metabolic function, but its availability may be compromised due to the impairment of homeostasis in the inter-tissue metabolism of amino acids.

Dos Santos et al () suggest that the increase in macrophage function induced by exercise is supported by enhanced glutamine consumption and metabolism, which highlights the importance. Other cells of the immune system remain to be studied. The high rate of glutamine utilization and its importance to the function of lymphocytes, macrophages and neutrophils have raised the question "why glutamine?" because these cells have access to a.

This study suggests an increase in macrophage function post-exercise, which was supported by enhanced glutamine consumption and metabolism, and highlights the importance for glutamine after exercise.

This study investigated the effect of exercise on glutamine metabolism in macrophages of trained rats. The clinical significance of the role of glutamine in immune cells. Knowledge of the role of glucose for the brain, red blood cells and other tissues has led to an understanding of the significance of the maintenance of a normal blood glucose level, of the complex controls that ensure that the blood glucose level is controlled, and of the clinical importance of hypoglycaemia (NEWSHOLME and.

Many aspects of the cell biology of lymphocytes, macrophages, and neutrophils have been studied extensively. Our recent work on these cells has investigated how fuel metabolism, especially glutamine metabolism, is related to the specific function of these cells in the inflammatory response.

The high rate of glutamine utilization and its metabolism in such immune cells has raised the question of why glutamine is responsible for these functions. Glutamine and Macrophage Function Claire Wallace and David Keast The effects of glutamine concentration on the phagocytosis of an opsonized antigen, the synthesis of RNA, and the production of interleukin-1 (IL-1) by macrophages were investigated in vitro.

The importance of glutamine metabolism for immune cell function has recently become apparent and is discussed in detail in this review. Glutamine metabolism in isolated cells. The importance of glutamine to cell survival and proliferation in vitro was first reported by Ehrensvard et al.

() but was more fully described by Eagle et al. Glutamine had to be present at to fold in excess of. Glutamine is an important amino acid with many functions in the body. It is a building block of protein and critical part of the immune system.

Glutamine is the most abundant and versatile amino acid in the body. In health and disease, the rate of glutamine consumption by immune cells is similar or greater than glucose. For instance, in vitro and in vivo studies have determined that glutamine is an essential nutrient for lymphocyte proliferation and cytokine production, macrophage phagocytic plus secretory activities and neutrophil.

Glutamine is an important metabolic fuel that helps rapidly proliferating cells meet the increased demand for ATP, biosynthetic precursors, and reducing agents.

Glutamine enters the cell through the amino acid transporter, ASCT2/SLC1A5, and is converted to glutamate in the mitochondria through a deamination reaction catalyzed by glutaminase (GLS). Glutamine (Gln) is the most abundant free amino acid (AA) in the body with concentrations fluctuating around – μmol/L.

The biological functions of Gln have been widely studied, and they have opened new targets because Gln could modulate physiological functions such as immune enhancer, muscular maintainer, nitrogen transporter, neuronal mediator, pH homeostasis.

Metabolism of glucose, glutamine, long-chain fatty acids and ketone bodies by murine macrophages. Biochem J ; – CAS PubMed PubMed Central Google Scholar. Glutamine uptake and metabolism is also enhanced in response to TLR4 activation.

Although metabolic reprogramming is important for macrophage activation, it remains unclear how changes in the nutrient microenvironment interface with these changes in cellular metabolism to influence cell phenotype. Glutamine metabolism as a whole is a crucial element of cancer cell metabolism.

Glutamine is important for nucleotide synthesis, amino acid production, redox balance, glycosylation, extracellular matrix production, autophagy, and epigenetics (3, 21). In this report, we employed a small molecule – a.

Abstract. Skeleton has emerged as an endocrine organ which is both capable of regulating energy metabolism and being a target for it. Glutamine is the most bountiful and flexible amino acid in the body which provides adenosine 5-triphosphate (ATP) demands for cells.

Emerging evidences support that glutamine which acts as the second metabolic regulator after glucose exerts crucial roles in bone. Abstract Glutamine metabolism provides synergistic support for macrophage activation and elicitation of desirable immune responses; however, the underlying mechanisms regulated by glutamine.This study suggests an increase in macrophage function post-exercise, which was supported by enhanced glutamine consumption and metabolism, and highlights the importance for glutamine after ção de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo (FAPESP)Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Ctr Estudos Psicobiol & Exercicio, BRAbstract.

This study investigated the effect of exercise on glutamine metabolism in macrophages of trained rats. Rats were divided into three groups: sedentary (SED); moderately trained (MOD) rats that were swim trained 1 h/day, 5 days/week for 6 weeks; and exhaustively trained (EXT) rats that were similarly trained as MOD for 5 weeks and, in the 6th week, trained in three 1-h sessions/day.